HISTORY OF JCAD

 JCAD's history dates back to August 1990, when heat wave hit Maebashi city, Japan, which hosted World Championship Cycling 1990. High school boys named Narihiro Inamura and Toshinobu Saitoh (both are now super Keirin racers) made a pair and entered for tandem sprint race in the championship. Despite less expectation, the young duo beat powerful and experienced elite cyclists and successfully won silver medals. This great feat motivated a vision-impaired Japanese who used to enjoy cycle sports before he became a disabled. "Hey, there is a tandem. Vision-impaired like me can ride on a bicycle; there is a tandem!" A young Japanese named Toyoaki Kikuchi, 27 years old, with determination, held "1st Tandem Cycle Enjoyable Ride" and established Japan Cycle Association for the Disabled in November 1990.

 The "Ride," designed to provide cycling opportunity to and share cycling enjoyment with vision-impaired, has been held twice each year since then.

 As time went by, cyclists who cannot confine themselves only in recreational cycling and who want to do more "competitive" cycling began to appear. The movement led JCAD officials to hold National Championship Cycle Race first time in 1993. Prior to national level competition, some Japanese had already entered in international tandem races since the first trial in 1991 in France. Motivated disabled cyclists have also actively participated in a variety of domestic cycle races - mainly enduro - competing with non-disabled in their categories.

 Disabled cyclists in Japan are not blessed with good environment. Tandem cycling is generally prohibited except in a few municipalities. Traffic condition in Japan (narrow and congested roads) scares handicapped cyclists who cannot ride in a stable manner. Despite these negative surroundings, our cyclists and staff have come up with some effective training methods and areas, and have made strenuous efforts. As the result, Japanese disabled cyclists have shown great performance both in international and domestic competitions.

 Japanese cyclists' first appearance in Paralympic Games was at 1996 Atlanta. Mutsuhiko Ogawa (Cerebral Palsy Division 2) won one gold and one bronze.

 Having gone through long and "unbelievably" hard training, Team Japan went to 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, where Japanese Para-cycling showed to the rest of the world what they have accumulated in the past many years. Japan Para-cycling Team for 2008 Beijing Games won 1 gold, 3 silver, and 2 bronze medals, and two 4th places in Beijing Paralympic.

 Japanese Para-cyclists, with further upward ambition and integration to able-body's people, keep struggling to achieve outstanding and world-wide sporting success. We will never stop.


JCAD Chairman and Founder Kikuchi in his first entry to international tandem race in France
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